Sunday, July 8, 2018

Doctor Who: The Seventh Doctor #2 - A Review

The Doctor, Ace and their friends in the Counter-Measures Group are still investigating the apparent crash of an alien spacecraft in the Australian Outback. Sabotage has delayed their efforts, but who is responsible? And could the alien menace they fear has come to Earth already be among them?


Christopher Jones continues to prove himself the consummate Doctor Who comic artist. His work on Titan Comics' Third Doctor mini-series was phenomenal and his work here is of equal quality. He perfectly captures the appearances of the actors from the classic television series and draws some fantastically imaginative visuals.

The story, I'm sad to say, will not be everyone's cup of tea. Unsurprisingly, Andrew Cartmel perfectly emulates the tone of a Seventh Doctor story. The problem is that what comes off well on film does not always work in a comic book.

While I personally love the sly Seventh Doctor and how he cunningly manipulated events while seemingly doing nothing at all, the pay-off in many Seventh Doctor stories usually came at the end when the conjurer's trick was revealed. I have no doubt we'll get a smashing reveal in the next issue but this issue comes off a little flat, with two page sequences of coded messages being silently translated and The Doctor not doing much beyond facilitating a high-speed escape.

Again, this is typical of the McCoy era, and fans of the Seventh Doctor will love it. Everyone else, sadly, will not see the point. In this, the comic perfectly captures the spirit of the era, though it does make it a bit inaccessible to new fans.

The Final Analysis: 8 out of 10. It's perfectly captures the feel of a Seventh Doctor television episode. For good and for ill. 


Injustice 2 #64 & #65 - A Review

The Red Lanterns' siege of Oa continues in Injustice #64. The Red Lanterns' still have Starro The Conqueror on their side, and through it control of a Guardian and many Green Lanterns. Can Hal Jordan find it in himself to be a leader again?  If he can, will The Green Lanterns follow him despite his past crimes?



An unexpected arrival turns the tide of the battle in Injustice 2 #65. But the new arrival is not there to save Oa or to defeat the Red Lanterns. They have come for Conner Kent, the new Superman!




I regret that my Tuesdays of late have been so busy as to not find the time to discuss this book in a more timely manner. If pressed to pick a single favorite comic book right now, I dare say this might be it. Tom Taylor's command of these characters - many of whom no longer exist in the regular DC Comics universe (or, at least, are heavily sidelined) - is astonishing and I still say that when the current creative teams are done with their runs we need Tom Taylor writing a Green Lantern book.

As far as the artwork goes, it is ever fantastic. I have a slight preference for Bruno Redondo's clearer lines and Gabe Eltaeb's delicate inks over the grittier aesthetic preferred by Xermanico, but that is only because I think it generally fits the tone of Taylor's stories better. Generally, this is true, but Xermanico proves the perfect artist to draw the darker-toned Injustice 2 #65. The colors by both Juan Albarran and J. Nankan are spectacular and Wes Abbott is, as always, wonderful about using his balloon placement to enhance the action rather than obscuring it.

Bottom Line: There are both great issues. This is a fantastic series and it should be an obvious pick-up for anyone who loves the DC Universe.

The Final Analysis: 10/10 for both issues.

Friday, July 6, 2018

Red Sonja/Tarzan #3 - A Review

The time-traveling hunter known as Eson Duul has set his sights on the Greystone family. Now, Red Sonja and Tarzan are in a literal race against time. Fortunately, The Greystroke family is far from defenseless, as the son of John Clayton is known to the great apes as Korak - their word for killer! And he does not stand alone in the battle against Duul and his forces, even without his father and the She-Devil With A Sword!


Red Sonja/Tarzan #3 is surprisingly free of either of its title characters. It is not lacking in action, however, with most of the issue focused on the exploits of Korak, Son of Tarzan, and Windia - an African woman warrior who could give any member of the Dora Milaje a run for their money.

Those who have enjoyed this series so far will find the third issue contains more of the same spirited writing and action-packed artwork.The only real flaw, and I admit this is a nitpicky one, is that I expect to see more of Red Sonja and Tarzan in a book called Red Sonja/Tarzan. Thankfully, the final pages promise that in plenty next month.

The Final Analysis: 7 out of 10. Old-fashioned pulp action, marred only by our title characters being largely absent from this issue.

Thursday, July 5, 2018

Elvira: Mistress of the Dark #1 - A Review

You know her as Elvira: Mistress of the Dark - star of stage, screen, games... and comic books! Yet nothing you've seen can prepare you for the terror that awaits you, as Elvira falls through a time-traveling coffin and into horror history! Her first stop - a wild weekend with Mary Shelley and a real vampire in search of new brides.



Fans of the horror hostess with the mostess are sure to get a kick out of this book.Writer David Avallone perfectly captures the humor and voice of Cassandra Peterson, with all the puns and innuendo you'd expect of Elvira. The animated artwork of Dave Acosta and Andrew Covalt proves a good match for the story, ironically presenting a colorful view of a character so normally associated with black and white. People who don't get the joke will have a miserable time, but fans of Deadpool and the writing of Gail Simone will laugh themselves silly.

The Final Analysis: 8 out of 10. If you like cheesy jokes and cheesy horror, this is a must read.